Pig Society Part III


David
Cameron took a break today from trying to convince a very very
unconvinced public that the Big Society idea is such a wondrous
agenda, to work for a No vote for AV. So whilst he’s doing that, I
thought i’d continue my series of blogs on the Big Society, by
going one by one through the Tory/Lib Cabinet, and letting you all
know what it is each is doing for the Big Society; what they
volunteer for. Which ones run their public libraries, which ones
have found the time, like the rest of us must do, to run their
local school. I’m almost certain they practice what they preach. It
would be terribly pathetic if they didn’t.

  • Prime Minister David Cameron, Tory: No
    voluntary work declared.

  • Deputy Prime
    Minister Nick Clegg, Liberal Democrat:
    No voluntary
    work declared.

  • Secretary of State for
    Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs William Hague,
    Tory:
    No voluntary work declared.

  • Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne,
    Tory:
    No voluntary work declared

  • Chief Secretary to the Treasury Danny Alexander,
    Liberal Democrat
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for the Home
    Department; and Minister for Women and Equalities Theresa May,
    Tory:
    No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and
    Skills, and President of the Board of Trade Vince Cable, Liberal
    Democrat:
    No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Iain Duncan
    Smith, Tory
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
    Chris Huhne, Liberal Democrat
    : No voluntary work
    declared.

  • Secretary of State for Health
    Andrew Lansley, Tory
    : No voluntary work declared.
    Far too busy selling the NHS to American Private health firms.

  • Secretary of State for Education Michael
    Gove, Tory
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for Communities and Local
    Government Eric Pickles
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for Environment, Food
    and Rural Affairs, Caroline Spelman Tory:
    “I have
    been chair of two local charities MABL and Welcome although in my
    new role as a cabinet minister I have had to step back to be a
    patron but the first of these has hit a very difficult patch
    financially so I have had to spend a lot of time trying to help
    secure sustainable funding for MABL which helps the victims of
    domestic violence. We are not out of the woods yet and I have yet
    more meetings planned this week to try and save it. I have to be in
    the department in Whitehall even when parliament is not sitting so
    it is not easy to schedule the time but I come home every Friday
    and help also at the weekend.” – I fully salute Spelman for this.
    Not so much for trying to privatise trees.

  • Secretary of State for Transport Phillip Hammond,
    Tory
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for International Development
    Andrew Mitchell, Tory
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics,
    Media and Sport Jeremy C….Hunt, Tory
    : No voluntary
    work declared.

  • Secretary of State for
    Northern Ireland Owen Paterson, Tory
    : No voluntary
    work declared

  • Secretary of State for
    Scotland Michael Moore, Liberal Democrat
    : No
    voluntary work declared.

  • Secretary of
    State for Wales Cheryl Gillan, Tory
    : No voluntary
    work declared.

  • Leader of the House of
    Commons, Lord Privy Seal Francis Maude, Tory
    : No
    voluntary work declared.

  • Attorney General
    Dominic Grieve, Tory
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Solicitor General Edward Garnier,
    Tory
    : No voluntary work declared.

  • Chief Whip Patrick McLoughlin, Tory:
    No voluntary work declared. So that’s one out of 23. I’m not too
    good at maths, never have been, but I believe that’s about 4%. Just
    saying…..

    Advertisements
  • 5 Responses to Pig Society Part III

    1. Charles says:

      Seems to be taking a back seat to demonising, criminalising and stigmatising the disabled and unemployed now the scapegoats for a multitude of societal problems. Just like the jews of the “good” old days but that kind of thing went out of fashion with the end of the second world war didnt it? I guess not, but jews are now safe unless they are poor ones.

      The answer to unemployment, community service as a punishment, they are immoral after all being lazy or workshy, thieves stealing from others that work hard and everything about big society seems to makes sence. We don’t need to ask where all these voluntary workers will come from.

      Forget about there being no jobs and forget that capitalism cannot create or maintain full employment. These are really not the tory parties main concerns, not like tax cuts asap for the very fortunate or redistribution of wealth from the public to the private sector. Remember big government is evil, it taxes them stealling their money. The worst of it is how the government spends the money, it gives money to the great unwash, the Hoi polloi.

      As Bertrand Russell wrote, “Advocates of capitalism are very apt to appeal to the sacred principles of liberty, which are embodied in one maxim: The fortunate must not be restrained in the exercise of tyranny over the unfortunate.” Get the tory message, they don’t give a crap about you, work or die and if you want services, volunteer and provide them yourself.

      This is the true face of David Cameron big society idea. This is their idea of social responsibility, you are responable for being unemployed there can be no other reason but “YOU”. The unemployed are the scapegoat of the most unsoluble problem capitalism, unemployment.

      In paying off the mistakes of the fortunate, who would be bankrupt if the rest where not providing a massive welfare package for them. The tory message changes to, we are all in this together.

      This is the true moral face of the tory party. The rich need tax breaks and government help but the poor you are on your own.

    2. Stephen says:

      You don’t understand; Tories go into politics as their contribution to “Big Society” – they have this duty to bring “moral improvement” to the rest of us.

      I can just hear them: “Parliamentary Salary? – that! a salary? My dear boy, that sort of amount is so small, I don’t even recognise it. why, I give my wife more than that for the housekeeping – and she has never worked. You think I do this for the ‘salary’ and then have to justify myself to little oiks like you? You ungrateful little pleb.”

    3. Charles says:

      How unjust the system is can be sumed up by take a bank like barclays as an example.

      Barclays has revealed it paid £113m in corporation tax to the UK in 2009, 2.4% of its £4.6bn annual profit. £3.5bn paid in salary and bonuses.

      Max Lawson, of the Robin Hood Tax Campaign puts it well, he said: “This is proof that banks live in a parallel universe to the rest of us, paying billions in bonuses and unhampered by the inconvenience of paying tax.”

      The likely cost to the public sector just to bailout RBS and Lloyds. The telegraph…
      “ONS is calculating that the figure will raise to between £1 trillion and £1.5 trillion, or 70pc-100pc of GDP, once the banks’ liabilities are transferred to the public sector balance sheet in due course.” This does not take the costs of the economic fallout for the rest of the economy.

      Before people blame just labour, lets here what Cameron said about the banking sector…

      “Cameron in June 2006, spoke of ‘the victory of capitalism, privatisation and liberalisation’. ….

      The Tory leader lauded the ‘highly innovative’ City as ‘the biggest international finance centre in the world’…. . he gave the credit for all that ‘innovative’ trading to ‘critical Conservative decisions’ when the Tories were in government. It proved that ‘light regulation’ and ‘low regulation’ were the ‘keys to success’.

      2) September 2007, Mr Cameron made a speech at the London School of Economics. He claimed that

      The Left’s silly idea that markets required tight regulation had been thoroughly discredited. ‘The result? The world economy now more stable than for a generation’.”

      ” bankers are clever people, they said, and they know what they are doing.

      This turned out to be true. Most of them were clever, and they did know what they were doing. Unfortunately, there was never any reason to think that the sum of all this individual cleverness would be stable in the long term, but much less beneficial for society as a whole. ”
      quote source
      http://reviewcanada.ca/essays/2009/09/01/did-the-banks-go-crazy/

      The problem here was the left was right Mr Cameron, and Mr Greenspan puts it so well.

      Greenspan: “I made a mistake in presuming that the self-interest of organizations, specifically banks and others, was such as they were best capable of protecting their own shareholders.”

      In other words the rational self-interest of banks was collectively self-defeating for all of us but also the markets could not function with light regulation. Some doubt that regulation can fix the problems at all. Capitalism in its purest form has been proven not to work. As Joseph Stiglitz has said many times, “Market Fundamentalism Is Dead”.
      source:- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_2-Tv2GPs0

    4. Argh! my next blog was going to be on Barclays!!!!

    5. zx128k says:

      “If taken to their logical conclusion, these policies mean that affluent neighbourhoods can have all the amenities they want, the best living environment, the best services, without having to share their council tax payments with the poorer people down the road. Less fortunate areas will fester for lack of cash. Then, when they do, this can be portrayed as their own choice and their own failure. “So you couldn’t pay for it?” the voices will say: “Then why didn’t you just volunteer like we suggested?””
      Source
      http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/feb/20/david-cameron-big-society-volunteering

    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s

    %d bloggers like this: